5.1.7S
PEST, DISEASE AND WEED RESTRAINT IN ORGANIC AGRICULTURE: IS THIS THE WAY FORWARD?

RA CROWDER

P0 Box 61, Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand

Background and objectives
Healthy soil, healthy plants, healthy society has long been the rallying cry of the organic movement. The survival of the organic movement through the 'Dark Ages' is one of perseverance in the face of ridicule, disbelief and persecution by scientists and the general public. This paper exarnines the fundamental aspects of holistic good husbandry, that have stood the test of 'rediscovery' in this age of accelerating environmental degradation.

Materials and methods
Much of the material used in this paper will be illustrated by reference to over 30 years' experience of the vegetable industry in New Zealand and the development of the organic demonstration, teaching and research unit at Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand, over a 20-year period [1, 2].

Results and conclusions
Perseverance is shown to have paid off at the University, with the survival, acceptance and expansion of the influence of 'organics' at both teaching and research levels. At the practical level, the New Zealand Vegetable and Potato Growers' Federation is urging its members to embrace more environmental, if not 'organic', approaches to their husbandry practices.

References
1. Crowder R, 1996. Proceedings 11th IFOAM International Scientific Conference, Vol.1, pp. 240-251.
2. Woodward L, Fleming D, Vogtmann H, 1997. The Organic Dilernma. A Discussion. Bulletin, Elm Farm Research Centre, Newbury, Berkshire UK, pp.1-8.