BSPP - BMS Joint Presidential Meeting 2017 - Fungal Control and Exploitation

University of Nottingham Jubilee Campus
11th-13th September 2017


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The call for abstracts is now open for the 2017 BSPP - BMS Joint Presidential Meeting: Download the abstract form here

Oral presentation abstract deadline is 30th June 2017. We are also now accepting abstracts for the PH Gregory and J Colhoun prizes and general posters for the conference (deadline 30th June 2017). Please indicate on the abstract form which session you are submitting your abstract to. All abstracts should be sent to meetings@bspp.org.uk. You should receive confirmation of receipt within 7 working days.


Download Transport information here


About the conference

The meeting will be a joint venture with the British Mycological Society (BMS), so there will be additional interest from the parallel BMS sessions, as well as several joint plenaries. The BSPP sessions will focus on the control of diseases using genetics (including GM and RNAi), pesticides and biocontrol. The BMS sessions will focus on control of human fungal pathogens, as well as exploitation of fungi, for example in biotechnology. We are delighted to have assembled a first-class programme of invited speakers for the meeting, with confirmed BMS and BSPP speakers so far including:

Invited Speakers

Scott Baker (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory); Axel Brakhage (Jena); Al Brown (Aberdeen); Mike Bromley (Manchester); Ronald De Vries (Utrecht); Alan Gange (Royal Holloway); Lise Nistrup Jorgensen (Aarhus); Karl-Heinz Kogel (Giessen); Mark Lynas (Author and Environmentalist); Vera Meyer (Berlin); Bruce McDonald (ETHZ Switzerland), Richard Michelmore (UC Davis); Richard Oliver (Curtin); Neil Paveley, (ADAS), Nick Read (Manchester); Natalia Requena (Karlsruhe); Sander Schouten (Wageningen), Eckhard Thines (Mainz), Frank van den Bosch (Rothamsted) and Vivianne Vleeshouwers (Wageningen).


Visit to Chatsworth House - birthplace of the Cavendish Bananas.

Cavendish bananas are "our" bananas - the banana we buy in UK supermarkets or any supermarket around the world. Today, they are the most widely grown bananas. And they became so popular by a plant disease: In the 1950s, an epidemic of Fusarium wilt devastated banana plantations in Middle America. Cavendish was the only resistant banana cultivar that could be grown. It saved the world's banana trade from collapse. We are planning an outing to nearby Cavendish house in association with the BMS/BSPP Annual meeting. This is a chance for a tailor-made tour of the famous glasshouse facilities originated by Paxton and to view an original clone of the Cavendish banana, first cultivated in 1833.

If you would like to take part in this tour, register your interest below.


Training for scientists

A FREE science communication workshop is offered on the final afternoon of the 2017 Presidential meeting to support scientists thinking of getting involved in public/schools engagement. It will be a generic sci comm workshop with a focus on plant pathology and will be very hands-on. Further details are available here, Reserve your place by email and remember the timing of this when planning your travel schedule (making this years Presidential Meeting even better value for money!)

Outreach support

Offers of short talks about your favourite pathogen, their significance and the techniques you are using to explore them are invited for the 3rd Damaging & Deadly teacher and VIth form mini-conference, that takes place just before the poster session at the Presidential Meeting.

In support of initiatives to ecourage women into STEM, we always have at least 1 female scientists among our 3 speakers. Please email BSPP's outreach officer to express your interest in giving one of these talks (phil.smith@nbi.ac.uk).

 


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Download the poster here