Molecular Plant Pathology On-Line [http://www.bspp.org.uk/mppol/1997/0116fuchs]

Management of Virus Diseases by Classical and Engineered Protection

Marc Fuchs1, Stephen Ferreira2 and Dennis Gonsalves3

1 Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456 (Phone 315-787-2351; Fax 315-787-2389; e-mail mf13@cornell.edu), 2 Department of Plant Pathology, University of Hawaii, 3190 Maile Way, Honolulu, HA 96822 (Phone 808-956-2840; Fax 808-956-2832; e-mail stephenf@hawaii.edu), and 3 Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456 (Phone 315-787-2334; Fax 315-787-2389; e-mail dg12@cornell.edu)

Corresponding Author:

Marc Fuchs, Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456
telephone: 315-787-2351 fax: 315-787-2389 email: mf13@cornell.edu

Accepted: 9 December 1996

Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION

2. CLASSICAL CROSS PROTECTION
2.1. Citrus Tristeza Closterovirus Cross Protection
2.1.1. Brazilian cross protection against stem pitting strains
2.1.2. Australian cross protection against stem pitting strains
2.1.3. Cross protection against decline inducing strains
2.1.4. Factors affecting effectiveness of CTV cross protection
2.2. Papaya Ringspot Potyvirus Cross Protection
2.2.1. Selecting a mild strain
2.2.2. Specificity of cross protection
2.2.3. Effect of mild strain
2.2.4. Implementing and commercializing cross protection
2.2.5. Factors affecting efficiency of cross protection
2.3. Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Potyvirus Cross Protection
2.3.1. Selecting a mild strain
2.3.2. Effectiveness of cross protection
2.3.3. Factors affecting effectiveness of cross protection
2.3.4. Commercialization of cross protection
2.4. Cucumber Mosaic Cucumovirus-Satellite RNA Cross Protection
2.3.1. China tests: Origination and deployment of CMV-satellite RNA isolates for cross protection
2.3.2. China tests: Effectiveness and extensive use of cross protection
2.3.3. China tests: Factors affecting efficiency of cross protection
2.3.4. Other field trials in the United States and Italy

3. ENGINEERED PROTECTION
3.1. Engineered Protection of Tomato
3.1.1. Control of tomato and tobacco mosaic tobamoviruses
3.1.2. Control of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus
3.2. Engineered Protection of Cucurbits
3.2.1. Transgenic cucumber and control of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus
3.2.2. Transgenic squash and control of zucchini yellow mosaic and watermelon mosaic 2 potyviruses
3.2.3. Transgenic cantaloupe and control of zucchini yellow mosaic and watermelon mosaic 2 potyviruses, and/or cucumber mosaic cucumovirus
3.3. Engineered Protection of Potato
3.3.1. Control of potato virus X potexvirus
3.3.2. Control of potato virus Y potyvirus
3.3.3. Control of PVX and PVY
3.3.4. Control of potato leafroll luteovirus
3.4. Engineered Protection of Papaya
3.5. Engineered Protection of Other Crops

4. DISCUSSION

5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

6. REFERENCES

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