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RT @BSPPjournals: We are delighted to welcome the cereal pathologist Rumiana Ray as a new Editor in our team!
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/biosciences/people/rumiana.ray @RumianaRay

RT @BSPPjournals: We also welcome grapevine pathologist Regina Billones Baaijens to the Editorial team! A good day for the journal!
https://www.csu.edu.au/nwgic/about-us/our-people/profiles/research-staff/regina-billones-baaijens

Go up or go down? Bursaphelenchus xylophilus dispersal in pine branches is random: https://bsppjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ppa.13223

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And we’re off (again) – reviving the BSPP Blogs

18th May 2019

The launch of the new BSPP website offers a new opportunity to revive the blog. I’ll be submitting regular articles that explore plant diseases around the world and discuss some of their wider implications. I also hope to highlight new developments, particularly in agriculture, comment on news items that catch my eye (or ear) and try to put plant diseases and plant health in a wider social and environmental context.

This is all a mite ambitious and I’ll welcome comments on what you think. Part of the thinking behind my aims comes from the mixed feelings I have about modern trends in plant disease research. partly because molecular biology and the astounding techniques for detecting pathogens and host responses baffle me. My main concern is knowing what happens to knowledge accumulated at the nanoscopic level. It’s a difficult question to ask – neatly avoided at a recent BSPP conference – but one we should remember.

Eric Boa