Latest Tweets

🌿Our Plants, Our Future. BS_PP conference
@royalsociety April 20-21st 2020 with @DefraGovUK @CONNECTED_Virus @N8research @UKRI_News #IYPH2020 #IYPH #planthealth #plantpath #plantdisease Registration Now Open http://bit.ly/3brGx5i

How plant cells sense the outside world through hydrogen peroxide https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00403-y

The Arabidopsis Senescence Associated Gene 13 Regulates Dark-Induced Senescence and Plays Contrasting Roles in the Defense Against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens. @MPMIJournal @MPMIMicrogreens @BS_PP @aspb
https://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/10.1094/MPMI-11-19-0329-R#.Xks5K7DPLtQ.twitter

Load More...

Dog Sleuths Sniff Out Crop Disease Hitting Citrus Trees

11th February 2020

WASHINGTON — Dog detectives might be able to help save ailing citrus groves, research published Monday suggests.

Scientists trained dogs to sniff out a crop disease called citrus greening that has hit orange, lemon and grapefruit orchards in Florida, California and Texas. The dogs can detect it weeks to years before it shows up on tree leaves and roots, the researchers report.

“This technology is thousands of years old – the dog’s nose,” said Timothy Gottwald, a researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a co-author of the study. “We’ve just trained dogs to hunt new prey: the bacteria that causes a very damaging crop disease.”

Dog sleuths are also faster, cheaper and more accurate than people collecting hundreds of leaves for lab analysis, according to the study in the Proceedings of National Academies of Sciences. Citrus greening — also called huanglongbing — is caused by a bacteria that is spread by a tiny insect that feeds on the leaves and stems of citrus trees. Once a tree is infected, there’s no cure.

The disease has also hurt citrus crops in Central and South America and Asia.

In one experiment in a Texas grapefruit orchard, trained dogs were accurate 95% of the time in distinguishing between newly infected trees and healthy ones.

“The earlier you detect a disease, the better chance you have at stopping an epidemic” by culling infected trees, explained Gottwald.

Read more at The New York Times